Saturday, 28 September 2013

More from London

If you feel up to it, we have a little more walking to do. This is the Covent Garden Market.
 

This part of London belonged in the 13th century to the Westminster Abbey and was known as "the garden of the abbey and convent".  Henry VIII took it and gave it to the Earls of Bedford, and in the 16th century there were fashionable new houses around an arcaded square, and a small open air fruit and vegetable market. In the 1830's these buildings in neo-classical style by the architect Charles Fowler were built to cover the market area.


 
In 1980 the protected place was reopened as a tourist location with cafes, pubs and shops. The Apple Market is a craft market.

 
A short walk from the market was another interesting part of the city.


The houses were not set around a square for an interesting reason. To maximise the number of houses as rentals were charged per foot of frontage and not per square feet of the interior, the area was laid out in a series of triangles.

 
Seven streets meet at this central point, and the Sundial Pillar was built in 1694, at the same time as the houses. The pillar has six sundial faces, and the column itself is the 7th 'style'.

 
On the way to the hotel we spent some time at the Fowles bookshop, but with my very tired feet (and head) the best they could offer was a comfortable chair.
 
As the next day will be even more walking and even more photos and facts, I'll show you the London part of it already. We started our one-day excursion at the Paddington Station, and guess whom we met there:
 


A very famous bear, waiting patiently to be looked after.

 
We took a morning train, because the 4.50 from Paddington sounded too exciting and because we wanted to see as much as we could at or destination.
 
This day in London was still a warm and almost sunny one, but here in Finland we have had our first frost nights and a sleet shower earlier this week. Räntää, sleet, it feels and looks as unpleasant as the Finnish word for it sounds. The dotted a's are pronounced like the a in the English word 'bad'.

8 comments:

  1. So interesting, Ulla, and the pictures are wonderful. You got a sunny day in London!!!
    Thanks for sharing. I felt like I was there.
    Hugs

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  2. I just love the old architecture. Very interesting how the buildings are laid out and the reason behind it. So much to see and do and only so many hours tired feet are willing. :o) I'm really enjoying your photos as it brings back a few memories from our trip to London.

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  3. Thanks for sharing your trip with us, Ulla. It's giving me more ideas of what to see next year.

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  4. I am enjoying the sights and the history lessons.
    No sleet here. We still have temperatures in the 20s.

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  5. Love being there with you:-) The English have solid history! and is it not the 450 from Paddington the tittle of miss Marple ?? I seem to remember.

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  6. But of course, sorry I just pressed on the link now. I have seen it more than twice, thanks for the link :))

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  7. I'm so happy you and your daughter have been to some of the wonderful highlights of London so far, Ulla! When Mr. Squash and I were at Paddington, one of the little bears somehow jumped into our bag ;>) Oh - and how I remember what all that walking does to my feet! I loathe to admit it but these days one of those motorized sit down chairs almost seems like the way to go ;>)
    Cheers!

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  8. What an onomatopoeic word for sleet. Covent Garden is where Hubby used to explore when he worked in London. Thank you so much for the trip. Paddington is such a sweet bear.

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