Monday, 29 August 2011

Autumn colours and harvest time, knitting

On Friday we had a very warm weather and I had a long walk in the forest. It is harvest time. Combine machines have threshed the corn, berries have been picked in the gardens. There are still wild berries in the forest, like arctic bilberries


and lingonberries


Hawthorn berries in a tree in the park of the library:


Lovely red of the poisonous toadstool amanita


Many edible mushrooms are brown


These yellow ones may be edible, or not. I always check twice and ask Mr. K before using any mushrooms for food.


All plants are making their seeds ready to fly with the wind or to fall on the ground or to be eaten and spread by the birds. This is willowherb.


My own harvest in the vegetable patch is showing no signs of real progress:



My Jersey tomatoes have grown big and lovely, but there is still no sign of red in them. We have had a handful of the smaller domestic tomatoes to taste.

I have not been sewing anything I can show just yet, as they will be my PIF gifts. Because no new names were signed on my list, I have decided to make a baby sweater project in Ethiopia my third PIF recipient. A Finnish midwife has started a project in Ethiopia in order to get the women to hospital to give birth to their baby. If they do, the baby will get a knitted sweater like this to go home with. Also, this way the baby will be registered and get a birth certificate.


This is my first sweater for them, just knitted and not yet sewn together. In September there will be information about how to send them to Africa. The deliveries are on hold now, as there has been a new customs fee to be paid for the sweaters, and  the hospital people are negotiating about this and hoping to avoid the extra cost.

12 comments:

  1. That looks like a nice baby sweater. Is it sock yarn? My tomaoes are not red yet either but my son has some and they are quite sweet.

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  2. What a wonderful walk you took in the forest! Love the mushrooms, especially the yellow ones!
    You are so special, making sweaters for Ethiopia as your third PIF!!!
    Hope your tomatoes turn red soon (o:

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  3. I love your mushroom photos- they look magic! I found one tomato in my patch when I was sorting out the veg bed- the tomato was about 1cm across!!!!! Yours are a good size anyhow! My Gran used to pick her green tomatoes and line them up on a sunny window sill to ripen if they were not turning red. It always worked for her.

    Your sweater idea is a very good one, and I think I will do the same when you have the address ready. Its a really good idea of the Nurse's too so I hope it works for the women.

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  4. knitting for others gives warmth to the knitter as well. it sounds like a good project, i hope it is successful.
    good photos of the berries, what do you do with the hawthorn berries? we have them here also.

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  5. Love your sweater project,your such a giving person. Thanks for the visit to my blog. We have been lucky the last couple of years to be missing the BIG storms and I for one am so glad. WE stillget a lot of water in our yard and Ray has to pump it out but as ong as it doesn't get intothe house I will be very happy. Have a beautiful week my friend. HUgs, Marie

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  6. Beautiful berries. My tomatoes are slow in ripening also. I have picked several, I have yellow ones this year. Many on the vines but not quite turning yet. Gosh these sweaters will be so wonderful for the new babies. I hope the postal system cooperates and the Mom's take advantage of hospital births.

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  7. Ulla, that's a lovely sweater and a beautiful project.

    I gave up on growing tomatoes two years ago. Yours look lovely, even if green!

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  8. Lovely walk Ulla ;-))
    Yes we have had some lovely weather too and I have also been on a long today but not in the woods. More like nearby the sea ..

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  9. What beautiful signs of Autumn! Today we plan to pick blackberries and sloes on our walk.

    What a sweet little design of baby jumper. Aren't import duties a pain- a greedy government wanting money from something which is to benefit its own people.YUK!

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  10. thankyou for the walk. Berries and the wonderful mushrooms. The knitting sounds wonderful and we are all part of the busy hands brigade. Good luck with the project.

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  11. It's lovely to think we were both walking in the forest around the same time, just many miles apart! Lovely photos - you can just tell there is a hint of fall in the air! The baby sweater is beautiful and so thoughtful, Ulla! I also enjoyed the pictures of Mr. K fishing and his trout!
    Cheers!

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  12. Deine herbstlichen Impressionen lassen Vorfreude auf den hier ebenfalls langsam beginnenden Herbst aufkommen. Noch geniessen wir im Moment hochsommerliche Temperaturen, aber das soll sich in den nächsten Tagen ändern. Jede Jahreszeit hat doch ihren speziellen Reiz.
    Dein Babypullover gefällt mir sehr. Ist er einfach gerade gestrickt, mit verschiedenen Mustern? Es reizt mich gerade auch einen solchen zu machen....habe schon lange nicht mehr gestrickt. Leider habe ich die Aethiopien Website nicht lesen/verstehen können. Ich könnte ja meine nicht vorhandenen PIF Empfänger auf diese Weise "abarbeiten" ?! Liebe Grüsse von Barbara (die gerade aus Prag zurück und noch etwas müde von den vielen Eindrücken ist)

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